Category Archives: Security and survival

Eyes on the road

 

How five elder women are creating an intentional community in an expensive housing market

By Saki Bailey,|June 4, 2019

Five elder women in one of the highest-cost urban areas in the United States are banding together to build the intentional retirement community of their dreams.

San Francisco Bay Area residents Mary McDonald, Barbara Reusch, Alisa Foster, Harriet Tubman Wright, and Ina Clausen  were all concerned about where they would be living in 10 or 20 years, who would be helping to care for them as they aged, and how they could achieve their desire to age in an intentional community — especially given soaring housing costs. Hibiscus Commons, which is slated to be the first elder cooperative created in partnership with the Bay Area Community Land Trust, was born out of their conversations.

“If you are a homeowner, you may have the luxury of aging in your own home, but this isn’t the case for a lot of lower-income elders who have never been homeowners,” said co-founder Mary McDonald. “Even for those lucky enough to stay in their own homes, it can be lonely and isolating to age on your own, and expensive to get in-home care.”

Aging with security and dignity can be difficult or even impossible for some seniors. The fastest-growing segment of the homeless population is people older than 55, and that cohort is likely to keep growing as the U.S. ages. The number of Americans aged 64 or older will nearly double by 2030 from 20 years earlier, to 70 million. In the expensive East Bay, the problem is acute. “Almost half of the Oakland homeless population became homeless after the age of 50,” said Harriet Wright.

Hibiscus Commons, a self-managed elder cooperative and intentional community, addresses all of these things: the isolation that comes with aging, the insecurity of housing and living on a fixed income in an area with one of the highest costs of living in the U.S., and accessing the care needed as one grows older.
Read more…

911-Need we look again?

This video by David Hooper is the best document I have seen about the events that resulted in the destruction of the World Trade Center in New York on 9-11-2001.

Methodically raising the obvious questions, presenting numerous testimonies, and examining plausible explanations, this video will keep you riveted as much as the best mystery thrillers, and probably lead you, as it did me, to consider the unthinkable about what really happened on that fateful day.

ANATOMY OF A GREAT DECEPTION (New and Updated Sept 2014).

Protect your privacy online

The August 24 edition of 60 Minutes alerted me to the problem of data mining and the unintended consequences of my activity o the web. I strongly recommend that you watch this segment and take action to protect your privacy.

Some of the tools that are mentioned are:

The search engine, DuckDuckGo

Disconnect privacy products, and,

MaskMe, which allows you to create disposable email addresses, phone numbers, and credit cards. Here’s a review that appears in PC Magazine, By Neil J. Rubenking

Hardly a day goes by without news of another organization suffering a data breach involving thousands or even millions of stolen user data records. If your email information appears in the mix, your antispam utility will probably see a spike in pointless mail. Abine’s free MaskMe service lets you communicate with retailers, discussion groups, and other websites without ever giving them your actual email address, so they can’t lose it in a data breach (or sell it to spammers). As a bonus, it also serves as a simple password manager. More…

Hopefully, we can prevent the internet from becoming a worse wasteland than broadcast TV. –t.h.g.

Affordable Housing: Here’s a great article to help you find it.

An article in Shareable, describes, 11 Affordable Housing Alternatives for City Dwellers.

“After World War II, white, middle-class Americans flocked to the suburbs from the city. Today, that trend is reversing. As post-suburbanites move back into cities, escalating housing costs are forcing low and middle income folks and people of color out to the suburbs. This shift was described by Alan Ehrenhalt in his 2013 book, The Great Inversion. The result is that the diverse communities that make cities resilient creative centers are being displaced or forced to find new, affordable housing options.

“In June, Shareable partnered with the San Francisco Public Press to explore the housing crisis. Through a series of articles and an event dubbed Hack the Housing Crisis we looked at causes of and solutions to the housing crisis. While the event was focused on San Francisco – the most expensive housing market in the United States – cities around the world are facing similar problems or soon will be.

“Through the month of June, we published articles about public housing done right,  new rules for in-law suites in San Francisco, biourbanism, housing auctions in Detroit, a follow-up to Hack the Housing Crisis, and more. Our partners at San Francisco Public Press also ran a number of housing stories online and are issuing a special housing-themed print edition of their paper this month.

“Here, we’ve rounded up 11 affordable housing alternatives for city dwellers because if we want cities to thrive, we need to rethink how we house everybody, not just the rich.”

Read the rest of the story.

Farming with nature

From “fir tree desert” to model permaculture farm.

This is what we’re made of.

The world is facing a multi-dimensional mega-crisis. How will we respond?

Will we fight among ourselves in a Hobbsian war of all against all, or will we pull together, sharing what we have and cooperating to create a better world. This moving story about the boat evacuation of lower Manhattan on 9/11 gives me hope.